MAS APOYOS PARA LA ENSEÑANZA DEL ESPAÑOL

El Capítulo de Miami de la Conferencia Nacional de Mujeres de Puerto Rico (NACOPRW) adoptó el siguiente acuerdo en su reunión del 10 de Julio:

“En conjunción con LULAC Florida, NAACP Florida, LCLAA, UTD, NACAE, LWV-Miami, y SALAD, apoyar y abogar activamente por la aplicación de programas de educación de calidad de alfabetización bilingüe que brinden acceso equitativo a todos los estudiantes de la escuela primaria a la instrucción en idioma español, al igual que a las políticas que actualicen y amplíen la investigación de programas bilingües”.

Anuncios

COREY MITCHELL: Miami-Dade Postpones Proposed Changes to Foreign Language Instruction

Image result for alberto carvalho

Education Week, 05-28-2015

Miami-Dade schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho told the Miami Herald that he will postpone scheduled changes to the way the district teaches foreign languages.

Amid growing criticism of his plan, the superintendent will convene a task force to work on proposals that could roll out during the 2016-17 school year.

Under Carvalho’s proposed plan, students would not receive bilingual instruction unless they’re in intensive language immersion programs with instruction in subjects such as math, science, and social studies split between English and another language.

Once fully implemented, the school system’s “extended foreign language” program would bolster foreign language instruction by making it more intensive, but not available to all students.

The district has already begun to phase out daily 30-minute Spanish classes for kindergarten, 1st grade and 2nd grade students, a move that has drawn criticism from the NAACP, League of United Latin American Citizens, and other groups. The instruction for 3rd grade students would have been cut this fall.

Educators who would have been charged with executing the “extended foreign language” program also had objections.

A story by Miami Herald reporter Christian Veiga highlights the concerns of Spanish-language teachers. Many said that they would be forced to teach classes in Spanish in math or other subjects in which they are not certified. Veiga’s piece also reveals that Miami-Dade schools, based in a region with a sizable Spanish-speaking population, struggles to find qualified Spanish teachers.

Carvalho told the newspaper’s editorial board that parents’ demand for rigorous bilingual education for their children prompted the district to explore ways to overhaul how it teaches students a second language.

“This has never been about getting rid of bilingualism; it’s about improving the way we teach Spanish,” Mr. Carvalho said.

Now district officials are headed back to the drawing board.

Rosa Castro Feinberg, an English-language learner activist and former Miami-Dade school board member, said in an interview with Education Week that she applauds Carvalho “for his decision to upgrade Spanish programs with input from stakeholders and expert members of a task force.”

“He has shown wisdom … in thereby respecting his board members’ oft stated support for instruction leading to biliteracy. A fully transparent process for the task force will do much to allay the concerns of Miami-Dade communities,” she said.

CHRISTINA VEIGA: The uncertain future of español in Miami-Dade classrooms

(LEA AL FINAL LA VERSIÓN AL ESPAÑOL PUBLICADA EN EL NUEVO HERALD: EL FUTURO INCIERTO DEL ESPAÑOL EN LAS ESCUELAS DE MIAMI)

heraldKindergarten students at Aventura Waterways K-8 School practice their Spanish synonyms earlier this month. Photo: C.M. Guerrero, El Nuevo Herald.

The Miami Herald, 05-26-2015

Aleida Martinez-Molina learned how to read and write Spanish in the Miami-Dade County public school system decades ago, eventually going on to land a top job with a Spanish airline.

Today, the Coral Gables lawyer drives along a road with a Spanish name lined with flags from Latin American countries to take her son to a public school filled with mostly Hispanic kids. Yet she finds herself utterly disappointed with his education in, of all things, the Spanish language.

We live in South Florida. Hello — foreign language is a must for everybody,” she said.

Census data rank Miami as one of the most bilingual cities in the U.S. On the nightly news, in the halls of government and in the aisles of the supermarket, Miami-Dade County speaks español.

 But how well today’s schoolchildren read and write in Spanish — the real measure of fluency in an increasingly competitive economy — has become a matter of debate as the Miami-Dade County school system reconsiders how to teach children the native tongue of many of its residents.

“Our bilingualism is a myth,” said school board member Raquel Regalado.

Some language experts believe Miami’s command of Spanish is slowly slipping away, following a similar, well-documented historical trend of immigrant communities becoming increasingly assimilated.

“People believe that Spanish is inevitable here, but it’s really not,” said Phillip Carter, a sociolinguist at Florida International University. “The Spanish that we hear around town is mostly spoken by immigrants, not their children or grandchildren.”

 A glaring example of the shift and one that compounds it: The Miami-Dade school system — which keeps a Spanish interpreter on hand for public meetings and publishes its website in both languages —struggles to find qualified Spanish teachers.

“When you go into the intermediate grades and you really have to teach grammar rules … if you are not proficient in Spanish, you can’t do that just by having a Hispanic last name,” said Beatriz Zarraluqui, Miami-Dade’s director in the division of bilingual education and world languages.

The concern has been highlighted by the district’s move in the last two years toward more robust Spanish instruction to keep up with parent demand. That’s a major shift from the 1980s, when language battles revolved around an “English-only” campaign that succeeded in changing the state constitution to recognize English as Florida’s official language.

“I believe every child should have the opportunity to speak as many languages as possible,” said Shirley Johnson, education committee chair for the Florida NAACP.

 The NAACP, League of United Latin American Citizens and parents have recently called for better foreign language instruction in Miami-Dade, even holding a forum this month called S.O.S. — Save Our Spanish.

The emerging debate over Spanish language education began when the school system started quietly phasing out traditional, 30-minute-a-day Spanish classes. The cut began with second-graders in 2013 after some parents complained they weren’t enough to produce truly bilingual students.

Instead of the traditional Spanish classes, the district began an ambitious expansion of its in-demand “extended foreign language” program, where instruction in core areas like math and science is split between English and another language. Since 2012, the number of schools with extended foreign language has doubled to 138, with an estimated 20,000 students enrolled.

Experts agree that that type of immersive instruction is the best way for students to pick up another language.

“The more intense your program, the more time you spend in the target language, the more proficient” students become, said Marty Abbott, executive director of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.

Abbott also argues that it’s a cost-effective way to teach a foreign language because it eliminates the need for a separate Spanish teacher. Instead, the classroom teacher takes on that role, too.

In Miami-Dade, the program’s level of rigor has been its biggest selling point — but also possibly its weakest link. The intensity has made it highly sought-after by parents but out of reach for some students.

For example, Aventura Waterways K-8 often has a waiting list for its EFL program. And a student who doesn’t get into the program in kindergarten usually can’t start in the later grades. That’s because the rigor of EFL demands a certain level of familiarity in the target language, district officials say.

Additionally, students who are not on grade level in their native language aren’t eligible — even though studies show that learning another foreign language improves academic performance. One study in 2012 found that dual language instruction helped close achievement gaps among English-language learners, minorities and poor students in North Carolina.

“All students simply cannot handle the high demand and the high level of rigor in an EFL program,” said Marie Izquierdo, Miami-Dade’s chief academic officer.

Coupled with the cut to traditional Spanish classes, the move to more intense instruction has raised issues of access: Children either get intense foreign language instruction or none.

“It’s exclusionary. It’s elitist. It will have tons of economic ramifications,” said Rosa Castro Feinberg, the first Hispanic woman elected to the Miami-Dade school board in 1988.

There’s another problem: The extended foreign language program requires teachers to be able to read and write in both English and the target language, and to teach subjects like math and science. That sets a high bar. Spanish teachers are not always certified to teach other subjects, and teachers who are certified in other subjects may speak Spanish but don’t necessarily have the training or language skills to teach it.

“At times, we make the mistake of just assuming, because a person has a last name that is Hispanic, that they will be able to” teach Spanish, said Ingrid Robledo, who has been teaching Spanish in Miami-Dade schools for more than two decades. “That is a big mistake.”

One teacher in the extended foreign language program at North Beach Elementary described her unease over being tapped to teach in Spanish. Like many in South Florida, she grew up speaking Spanish only at grandma’s house, since both she and her mother were born in the U.S.

Now, she finds herself looking up words in a Spanish dictionary when teaching her students to read and worrying over her accent marks when sending letters home to parents whose native tongue is Spanish.

“I’ve just kind of been winging it. I feel like [the students] deserve much better than that,” said the teacher, who did not want to give her name.

The teacher’s experience is typical of the challenges that many immigrant communities have faced, experts say.

“There’s a very clear pattern of language shift,” said Andrew Lynch, a sociolinguist at University of Miami. “Once you’re in the U.S., there’s the ideology and pressure that here, ‘We speak English.’”

But Lynch and others think there are plenty of native-Spanish speakers living, and even already teaching, in Miami-Dade. Those critics say the district simply isn’t doing a good job of using the teachers already in the system, or recruiting native speakers from other fields. They also say the shortage of qualified teachers is indicative of how poorly local schools and colleges teach the language.

It is a nationwide problem. According to a recent paper by the council on the teaching of foreign languages, there was a shortage of foreign language teachers in 36 states in the lower grades and 39 states in upper grades last year.

In trying to find a balance between the concerns of parents on both sides of the issue, Miami-Dade has, for now, reversed its plan to cut traditional Spanish classes, a decision district officials say they made well before the public backlash. Third-grade classes were slated to be cut next school year.

The district is now asking for input about how to structure its foreign language programs.

“With the best of intentions, there are some challenges. You go and you tackle the challenges,” Superintendent Alberto Carvalho said at a recent school board meeting.

In many ways, Miami-Dade is reviving an old debate. Miami-Dade’s Spanish skills and the school system’s role in improving them were hot topics in the 1990s. The conversation was spurred by a 1996 survey by a University of Miami professor that found a quarter of local companies relied on new immigrants rather than recent graduates to conduct business in Spanish.

“We think our kids speak Spanish. Well, maybe they speak ‘kitchen’ Spanish or social Spanish,” said Mercedes Toural, a retired deputy superintendent. “But if they are going to compete in the workforce, they need to be able to read, write, draft business letters in Spanish.”

It’s a lesson the state of Delaware recently learned the hard way. When an insurance company with headquarters in the state was looking to expand about five years ago, the company went overseas despite the governor’s attempt to keep it in-state.

“They said they could not afford to expand a monolingual work force,” said Gregory Fulkerson, director of world language programming in Delaware.

Since then, the state has poured millions into expanding foreign language programs similar to Miami-Dade’s extended foreign language classes under a plan by Gov. Jack Markell. Delaware has also worked with local embassies to recruit teachers. The state is also thinking long-term, working with a university to create an “internal pipeline” of teachers by harnessing the skills of students who enter school already speaking another language

The state of Florida, on the other hand, does not invest specifically in bilingual education. It’s up to the districts to set their priorities. Miami-Dade spends more than $20 million to teach kids another language, according to Izquierdo, the chief academic officer in Miami-Dade.

“We make a disproportionate but strategic investment in foreign language instruction, the likes of which the state doesn’t,” Carvalho said at a recent school board meeting.

Izquierdo, the chief academic officer, explained at a recent school board committee meeting that the next year will be a “planning year.” The district wants to eventually replace the traditional Spanish classes but still meet the needs of all students. The new program — with “two pathways to biliteracy,” according to Izquierdo — will kick in during the 2016-2017 school year.

“Our ultimate goal of these programs is to produce biliterate and bilingual individuals,” she said.

Share your views on español education in Miami-Dade County:

▪ How important is it to you for children to learn another language while in school?

▪ If you’re a parent, student or teacher, what have your experiences and observations been when it comes to Spanish language instruction in schools?

▪ If you’re a business owner, what has your experience been when recruiting locals who have Spanish skills?

▪ What are your suggestions for how to teach Spanish to children in school?

…………..

El futuro incierto del español en las escuelas de Miami

Aleida Martinez-Molina aprendió a leer y escribir en español en las escuelas públicas del Condado Miami-Dade hace décadas. Poco después, consiguió un importante empleo en una aerolínea española.

En la actualidad, la abogada de Coral Gables maneja a lo largo de una calle que tiene un nombre en español y está repleta de banderas de países latinoamericanos para llevar a su hijo a una escuela pública llena de niños hispanos. Sin embargo, Martinez-Molina se siente muy decepcionada con la educación de su hijo, sobre todo en lo que se refiere al idioma español.

“Hay que darse cuenta que vivimos en el sur de la Florida. El idioma extranjero es una necesidad para todo el mundo”, dijo Martinez-Molina.

Según datos del Censo Nacional, Miami es una de las ciudades más bilingües de Estados Unidos. En los noticieros nocturnos, en los pasillos del Ayuntamiento y en las filas de los supermercados, en Miami-Dade se habla español.

Sin embargo, de qué forma los estudiantes leen y escriben en español —la verdadera medida de fluidez en una economía cada vez más competitiva— se ha convertido en un debate en tanto el sistema escolar de Miami-Dade ha entrado a reconsiderar cómo enseñar a los niños la lengua madre de muchos de sus residentes.

“Nuestro bilingüismo es un mito”, dijo Raquel Regalado, miembro de la Junta Escolar.

Algunos expertos en idiomas creen que el dominio de Miami del español está desapareciendo poco a poco, a medida que las comunidades de inmigrantes se asimilan cada vez más al inglés.

“La gente cree que el español es inevitable aquí, pero en realidad no lo es”, dijo Phillip Carter, profesor de Lenguas en la Universidad Internacional de la Florida (FIU). “El español que escuchamos por la ciudad es mayormente hablado por inmigrantes, no por sus hijos ni sus nietos”.

Un claro ejemplo del cambio es que el sistema escolar de Miami-Dade —que tiene disponible un intérprete de español para las reuniones públicas y publica su portal en internet en ambos idiomas— tiene dificultades para hallar maestros de español que estén calificados.

“Cuando el estudiante pasa a los grados intermedios y tiene que aprender reglas gramaticales, si el maestro no domina bien el español no basta con que tenga un apellido hispano para poder enseñarlo”, dijo Beatriz Zarraluqui, directora de la división de educación bilingüe e idiomas extranjeros de Miami-Dade.

La preocupación ha quedado evidenciada en la decisión del distrito en los dos últimos años hacia una enseñanza más sólida de español para de este modo seguir el ritmo de la exigencia de los padres. Se trata, sin duda, de un cambio importante con relación a los años 80, cuando las batallas por el idioma tenían que ver con la campaña de “Sólo Inglés” que logró que se cambiara la constitución estatal donde se reconocía al inglés como el idioma oficial de la Florida.

“Me parece que todos los niños deberían tener la oportunidad de hablar todos los idiomas que puedan”, dijo Shirley Johnson, directora del Comité de Educación del capítulo NAACP para la Florida.

La NAACP, la Liga de Ciudadanos y Padres Latinoamericanos Unidos, recientemente pidió que hubiera una mejor enseñanza de idiomas extranjeros en Miami-Dade, y este mes celebrará un foro llamado S.O.S.: Salvar nuestro Español.

El actual debate sobre la educación del idioma español comenzó cuando el sistema escolar empezó a eliminar poco a poco los tradicionales 30 minutos diarios de clases de español. Los recortes se iniciaron con alumnos de segundo grado en 2013 después que algunos padres se quejaron de que la enseñanza no era suficiente para crear verdaderos estudiantes bilingues.

En lugar de las tradicionales clases de español, el distrito empezó una ambiciosa expansión de su programa “idioma extranjero extendido” (EFL), donde la enseñanza en asignaturas importantes como Matemáticas y Ciencias se divide entre Inglés y otro idioma. Desde el 2012, el número de escuelas con EFL se ha duplicado a 138, con una matrícula estimada de 20,000 estudiantes.

Los expertos coinciden en que ese tipo de enseñanza de inmersión es la mejor forma para que los estudiantes aprendan otra lengua.

“Mientras más intenso es el programa, más tiempo se pasará en el idioma escogido, y más aptos se convertirán los estudiantes”, dijo Marty Abbott, directora ejecutiva del Concilio Americano de Enseñanza de Idiomas Extranjeros.

Abbott también argumenta que el EFL es una manera efectiva de enseñar un idioma extranjero ya que así se elimina la necesidad de tener un maestro de Español separado. Lo que el maestro hace es también enseñar Español.

En Miami-Dade, el nivel de rigor del programa ha sido la mejor forma de venderlo, prro a la vez posiblemente su punto más débil.

Por ejemplo, Aventura Waterways K-8 con frecuencia tiene una lista de espera para su programa EFL. Y un estudiante que no entra en el programa cuando está en kindergarten por lo general no puede empezar en grados superiores. Ello se debe a que el rigor de EFL exige cierto nivel de familiaridad en el idioma escogido, explicaron funcionarios del distrito.

Por otra parte, los estudiantes que no tienen cierto nivel en sus lenguas madre no son elegibles, aunque diversos estudios indican que aprender otro idioma extranjero mejora el rendimiento académico. Un estudio realizado en el 2012 en Carolina del Norte concluyó que aprender a la vez dos idiomas le facilita el aprendizaje a los estudiantes, a las minorías y los estudiantes pobres.

“No todos los estudiantes pueden enfrentarse con efectividad a la demanda y al alto nivel de rigor que tiene un programa EFL”, dijo Marie Izquierdo, jefa académica de Miami-Dade.

Unido al recorte de las clases tradicionales de español, la acción hacia una instrucción más intensa ha presentado dificultades de acceso: los niños o reciben una instrucción intensa en un idioma extranjero o ninguna.

“Es exclusivista. Es elitista. Tendrá toneladas de ramificaciones económicas”, dijo Rosa Castro Feinberg, la primera mujer hispana electa a la junta escolar de Miami-Dade en 1988.

Hay otro problema: el programa ampliado de lenguas extranjeras requiere maestros que sean capaces de leer y escribir tanto en inglés como en el idioma objetivo, y para enseñar temas como matemática y ciencias. Eso establece un nivel elevado. Los maestros de español no están siempre certificados para enseñar otras materias, y los maestros que están certificados en otras materias pueden hablar español, pero no necesariamente tienen el entrenamiento o las habilidades del lenguaje para enseñarlas.

“En ocasiones hacemos el error de asumir que porque una persona tiene un apellido que es hispano, será capaz de” enseñar español, dijo Ingrid Robledo, quien durante más de dos décadas ha dado clases de español en las escuelas de Miami-Dade. “Eso es un gran error”.

Una maestra del programa de idioma extranjero ampliado en la Primaria North Beach describió su incomodidad al solicitársele que enseñara en español. Como muchos en el Sur de la Florida, ella creció mientras hablaba español en casa de su abuela, ya que tanto ella como su madre nacieron en EEUU.

Ahora ella busca palabras en un diccionario en español cuando enseña a sus estudiantes a leer y se preocupa por las tildes cuando envía cartas a las casas de los padres cuya lengua nativa es el español.

“Lo hago con lo que sé. Siento que [los estudiantes] merecen algo mucho mejor que eso”, dijo la maestra, que no quiso dar su nombre.

La experiencia de esta maestra es típica de los desafíos que han enfrentado muchas comunidades de inmigrantes, dicen expertos.

“Hay un patrón muy claro de cambio del lenguaje”, dijo Andrew Lynch, un sociolingüista de la Universidad de Miami. “Una vez que estás en EEUU, existe la ideología y la presión de que aquí ‘Hablamos inglés’ “.

Pero Lynch y otros piensan que en Miami-Dade viven muchos que hablan español como su lengua materna y ya enseñan. Esos críticos dicen que el distrito simplemente no hace un buen trabajo en usar en otros campos a maestros que ya están en el sistema, o reclutar a personas cuya lengua nativa es el español. También dicen que la escasez de maestros calificados es un indicativo de cuan pésimamente las escuelas y colleges locales enseñan el idioma.

Es un problema nacional. De acuerdo con un reciente documento del consejo sobre la enseñanza de idiomas extranjeros, hay una escasez de maestros de idiomas en 36 estados en los primeros grados y en 39 en los últimos.

Al tratar de encontrar un balance entre la preocupación de los padres en ambas partes del problema, Miami-Dade ha dado marcha atrás, por ahora, al plan de recortar las clases tradicionales de español, una decisión que funcionarios del distrito dicen que hacían bien antes de la respuesta negativa del público. Las clases de tercer grado se preseleccionaron para recortarse el próximo año escolar.

El distrito pide ahora aportes sobre cómo estructurar sus programas de idiomas extranjeros.

“Con la mejor de las intenciones, hay algunos desafíos. Vas y enfrentas los desafíos”, dijo el superintendente Alberto Carvalho en una reciente reunión de la junta escolar.

En muchas formas, Miami-Dade revive un viejo debate. Las habilidades en español y el papel del sistema escolar en mejorarlas fueron temas calientes en la década de 1990 en Miami-Dade. La conversación se vio estimulada por una investigación de 1996 de un profesor de la Universidad de Miami que encontró que una cuarta parte de las compañías locales confiaban más en los nuevos inmigrantes, que en los recién graduados, para llevar a cabo negocios en español.

“Pensamos que nuestros niños hablan español. Bueno, quizás hablan español ‘de cocina’ o español social”, dijo Mercedes Toural, una vice superintendente retirada. “Pero si van a competir en la fuerza laboral, necesitan ser capaces de leer, escribir, y hacer borradores de cartas de negocios en español”.

Es una lección que aprendió recientemente en carne propia el estado de Delaware. Cuando hace cinco años una compañía de seguros con oficinas centrales en el estado buscaba expandirse, la compañía se fue al extranjero a pesar del intento del gobernador de mantenerla en el estado.

“Ellos dijeron que no pueden hacer frente a ampliar una fuerza de trabajo monolingüe”, dijo Gregory Fulkerson, director del programa de idiomas mundiales en Delaware.

Desde entonces, bajo un plan del gobernador Jack Marshall, el estado ha vertido millones de dólares en ampliar los programas de idiomas extranjeros con lecciones similares a las clases ampliadas de lenguas extranjeras de Miami-Dade. Delaware ha trabajado además con embajadas locales para reclutar maestros. El estado también piensa a largo plazo, al trabajar con una universidad para crear una “tubería interna” de maestros, al aprovechar las habilidades de estudiantes que entran a la escuela y ya hablan otro idioma.

Por otra parte, el estado de la Florida no invierte específicamente en la educación bilingüe. Depende de los distritos el establecer sus prioridades. Miami-Dade gasta más de $20 millones para enseñar a los niños otro idioma, de acuerdo con Izquierdo, la Principal Funcionaria Académica en Miami-Dade.

“Hicimos una inversión desproporcionada pero estratégica en la instrucción de idiomas extranjeros, que el estado no ha hecho de forma similar”, dijo Carvalho en una reciente reunión de la junta escolar.

Izquierdo, la Principal Funcionaria Académica, explicó en una reunión reciente de la comisión de la junta escolar que el año próximo será uno de “planificación”. El distrito desea remplazar eventualmente las clases tradicionales de español, pero aún enfrenta las necesidades de todos los estudiantes. El nuevo programa – con “dos caminos hacia la doble alfabetización”, de acuerdo con Izquierdo – comenzará durante el año escolar 2016-2017.

“Nuestro objetivo final con estos programas es producir individuos alfabetizados en los dos idiomas y bilingües”, agregó.

CAROLINA DEL NORTE APUESTA FUERTE POR EL BILINGÜISMO

Kindergartners wait in line after a water break at Collinswood. Selected by lottery, the 750 students at the K-8 magnet school are a nearly even mix of native Spanish speakers and native English speakers.Kindergartners wait in line after a water break at Collinswood

SCHOOL SUCCESSES INSPIRE N.C. PUSH FOR DUAL LANGUAGE

VIDEO: A LOOK INSIDE COLLINSWOOD

By Lesli A. Maxwell

At Collinswood Language Academy, a K-8 dual-language school in a working-class neighborhood in this Southern city, students produced some of the highest math achievement scores in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school district.

And that’s the case even though they learn all their math in Spanish, and take North Carolina’s annual end-of-grade math exams in English.

“Taking the tests in English was tricky at first,” said Mayra Martinez, an 8th grader who spoke only Spanish when she entered kindergarten at the school. “I remember the word ‘subtract’ stumping me.”

The school’s high marks in math—mirrored in reading and science—are coming from every category of student at Collinswood: low-income, English-language learners, Hispanic, African-American, white, and those in special education. They are inspiring a push to create more such programs statewide.

From kindergarten through 8th grade, Collinswood’s 750 students—who are a nearly even mix of native Spanish-speakers and native English-speakers—are taught math, social studies, Spanish/language arts, and higher-level language courses in Spanish. Science and English/language arts are taught in English. Physical education is taught in Spanish, and English is the main language of instruction for art and music. Collinswood is a magnet school that admits students from across the southern half of the 144,000-student district through an open lottery system.

“I think it’s the cognitive power they build because they have learned to transfer from one language to the next,” said Jacqueline Saavedra, a kindergarten teacher at Collinswood, in explaining why the school’s students consistently outperform most of their peers in Charlotte-Mecklenburg. “It raises their achievement in everything.”

Raising achievement across the board—while producing a new generation of bilingual, biliterate students—is at the heart of North Carolina’s statewide initiative to replicate the success of Collinswood and dozens of other dual-language immersion programs that have taken root during the last several years. Drawing in part on the language and cultural assets of a large and still-growing Spanish-speaking immigrant population, North Carolina is on the leading edge of a trend of steady growth in dual-language immersion programs in public schools across the nation that has been driven both by strong parental demand and growing recognition among educators of its promise for increasing achievement for English-learners. Roughly 2,500 dual-language programs are operating this school year, according to estimates from national experts.

‘Global Education’ Push

The state is so serious about it, in fact, that the North Carolina board of education has committed, as part of a larger strategic plan for promoting “global education,” to a number of initiatives that will expand and deepen dual-language programs during the next five years. Among those commitments: bringing at least one full dual-language immersion program that spans kindergarten through 12th grade to each of the state’s 115 districts, and partnering with colleges and universities to develop the special cadre of bilingual, biliterate educators—including teachers and administrators—that such programs demand.

“The bottom line for us is that all of our subgroups in dual-language immersion are doing well,” said Helga Fasciano, special assistant for global education in the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. “They all outperform their monolingual peers across the board.”

On top of the achievement gains, North Carolina’s quest to produce larger numbers of college- and career-ready graduates requires a bigger investment in “global education,” Ms. Fasciano said.

“With more graduates who are bilingual, biliterate, and who have deeply studied and gained understanding of other cultures and regions of the world, our communities gain so much from that,” she said. “And our students are prepared to go out and find success in such an interconnected world.”

Parsing Academic Gains

The achievement gains of dual-language learners alone, argues researcher Wayne P. Thomas, should be “getting every policymaker to jump out of his or her seat” to do more to support and expand dual-language immersion.

Mr. Thomas, a professor emeritus of evaluation and research methods at George Mason University, in Fairfax, Va., and Virginia P. Collier, a professor emeritus of education at George Mason, have been conducting a multiyear analysis of reading and math achievement to evaluate how North Carolina’s dual-language students are stacking up against their nondual-language peers. They have so far pored over three years of scores (2007-08 through 2009-10) on the end-of-grade reading and math exams given to students in grades 3-8. They have zeroed in on students in seven districts who are enrolled in two-way, dual-language programs—those where there is a close-to-even split of native English-speakers and native speakers of the other language of instruction, usually Spanish.

Overall, they have found that in the North Carolina districts with two-way, dual-language instruction, students score statistically significantly higher in reading in 4th grade than their nondual-language peers, a pattern that continues through 8th grade. By 5th grade, dual-language students score about the same as their monolingual peers a grade ahead of them, an advantage that lasts through 8th grade. The same pattern plays out in math, with 5th grade dual-language students scoring as high as nonprogram peers who are in 6th grade.

The two groups of students who are benefitting the most from dual-language instruction, the researchers say, are English-language learners and African-American students.

For English-learners in dual-language programs, reading scores in all the tested grades are much higher than for ELLs who are not in a dual-language program, according to the study. In math, the picture is the same. English-learners in dual-language programs score as high as their nondual-language ELL peers who are a grade ahead of them.

In their analyses, Mr. Thomas and Ms. Collier have found that African-American students in dual-language programs significantly outscore their nondual-language peers in reading in all tested grades. By the 4th grade, they are scoring ahead of their nondual-language peers who are a grade ahead of them. The pattern is the same in math.

“The number one impact of this type of instruction is on their cognitive development, which is cumulative every year,” Mr. Thomas said. “The other key factor is the level of student engagement. Those two things are adding up to a lot of positive effect for our most historically disadvantaged groups.”

The researchers have also conducted on-site interviews with teachers, students, administrators, and parents in the two-way, dual-language schools to get a better understanding of why achievement is strong, attendance rates are high, and students are engaged.

In delving into why black students are performing at much higher levels in dual language than their peers who are not, Ms. Collier said teachers offer some revealing answers.

Benefits Accrue

For some African-American students who may speak a nonstandard form of English at home, learning in Spanish is making them more “metalinguistically aware,” which teachers say develops their literacy skills in English, Ms. Collier said.

“Teachers also tell me that their African-American students are so highly engaged,” Ms. Collier said. “It’s like being in a gifted program where they are able to make leaps in learning and get to the more interesting stuff. They are not bored.”

What teachers like Ms. Saavedra at Collinswood see in their dual-language-learning students—high levels of engagement, ease of switching between two languages—has been borne out in cognitive research. Being bilingual—aside from the obvious advantage of enabling communication in more than one language—enhances memory and makes it easier to pay attention.

But with all the promise of dual language in North Carolina comes major challenges to expanding it on a broader scale.

Already, every dual-language program in the state—there are now about 90—struggles to find teachers who have both the language and pedagogy skills that are required, said Ms. Fasciano. And once they do find qualified teachers, holding onto them can be even tougher.

For the two-way dual-language programs and schools, the hunt for teachers requires hiring from outside the United States. Districts like Charlotte-Mecklenburg work directly with private agencies that help identify qualified foreign teachers and arrange with the U.S. State Department to secure visas, which are good for up to five years.

“We do have to rely on a pretty healthy number of international faculty,” Ms. Fasciano said. “The principals have really been the heroes in this effort. It’s them recognizing how powerful this type of instruction is for kids, and going to great lengths to make it happen.”

Nicolette Grant, the principal at Collinswood—which is recognized by the government of Spain as an exemplar school for Spanish-language instruction—said even in the state’s largest city, finding teachers for dual language is difficult. This school year, 11 members of the school’s faculty are visiting teachers from other countries such as Colombia, Mexico, and Peru.

“We get to keep them for no more than five years,” Ms. Grant said. “You can imagine the enormous adjustments they go through both professionally and personally upon moving here from their home countries. It’s not really until their third year that they hit their stride.”

In the 2012-13 academic year when North Carolina gave its first common-core aligned tests, Collinswood students—55 percent of whom are poor enough to qualify for free and reduced-price meals—dramatically outscored their peers in other Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools and the state, even though the schools’ scores dropped on the new, more rigorous exams.

Related Blog

Nearly 70 percent of students in the six tested grades scored at grade level or higher on the state’s end-of-grade tests in math. By comparison, that figure for the Charlotte-Mecklenburg district was 46 percent, and for the state, it was 42 percent. In reading, 65 percent of the school’s students scored at or above grade level, compared to 46 percent for the district and 44 percent in the state.

Twenty percent of the school’s English-learners scored at or above grade level on both reading and math tests, compared to 6 percent for the district and the state. And 50 percent of Collinswood’s black students passed both tests, compared to 18 percent in the district and 14 percent statewide.

View From Inside

At Collinswood on a rainy September morning, the noticias, or announcements, are underway, with some of the school’s 5th graders delivering the day’s news via Webcast to the school, all in Spanish.

In José Hernández’s physical education class, 3rd graders gallop in circles chanting a game that requires them to choose the right pronoun in Spanish: él for him, ella for her, and so on. Ms. Grant started Spanish-language P.E. a few years ago after noticing she wasn’t hearing as much Spanish in the cafeteria and on the playground.

“They had the academic Spanish, but they were lacking social Spanish,” she said.

Across the hall, Gilberto Franco-Yory’s 7th graders are intently focused on his lesson on poligonos, or polygons. And in Karen Meadow’s 6th grade science class, where English is the language of instruction, students are working in small groups doing research that will help them craft response plans to a hypothetical malaria outbreak.

“What I see is that our kids, who’ve been in dual language since kindergarten, are coming to my class with such rich prior knowledge that goes beyond the languages,” Ms. Meadow said. “They bring cultural perspectives about how science and environmental issues have impacted their grandmother’s country, or for our kids whose families aren’t immigrants, they’ve been exposed to these kinds of experiences,” through their classmates.

For parent Dolores Andral, the achievement of Collinswood’s African-American students is what sold her as she weighed whether to send her twin sons—now in 7th grade—to their neighborhood school or to apply for a spot at the dual-language school.

“Being a person of color, I have to look much more closely at what the data show for black students, especially black boys,” said Ms. Andral. “The performance of all students, but especially black students here, made it the choice for our family.”

Coverage of “deeper learning” that will prepare students with the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in a rapidly changing world is supported in part by a grant from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, at www.hewlett.org. Education Week retains sole editorial control over the content of this coverage.

JUNTA ASESORA DE ASUNTOS AFROAMERICANOS DEL CONDADO PIDE PROGRAMA BILINGÜE PARA TODOS LOS NIÑOS

CARTA DEL PRESIDENTE STEPHEN HUNTER JOHNSON AL SUPERINTENDENTE ALBERTO M. CARBALHO

PUNTOS IMPORTANTES DE LA CARTA:

  • Se hace claro que la capacidad para hablar con fluencia más de un idioma, particularmente español e inglés, es una ventaja económica en el sur de la Florida
  • Es imperativo que todos nuestros niños cuenten con las herramientas adecuadas para tener éxito y prosperar.
  • Necesitamos un currículo bilingüe para que todos los estudiantes graduados sean verdaderamente bilingües.
  • Solicitamos una reunión formal, tan pronto como sea posible, para discutir el tema de la educación bilingüe como parte del currículo de estudios

Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Office of the Superintendent

1450 N.E. Second Avenue

Suite 912

Miami, Florida 33132

Dear Superintendent Carvalho:

It was a pleasure meeting and speaking with you on May 8, 2015 at Perricones.  As I mentioned when we met, the Miami-Dade County Black Affairs Advisory Board is very interested in discussing the development and implementation of a bilingual educational curriculum for all students.

By way of background, on Saturday, January 31, 2015, the Miami-Dade Black Affairs Advisory Board sponsored a “Village Dialogue:  An Invitation from the Afro-Cuban Community.”  As a result of that meeting, and further discussions, it has become increasingly clear that the ability to speak more than one language-particularly fluency in Spanish and English-is an economic advantage in South Florida as a region, but particularly in Miami-Dade County, the aptly named gateway to the Americas.

Miami-Dade County’s two and a half million residents represent a spectrum of cultural, ethnic, and racial identities.  Our diversity means that Miami-Dade County is one of a few emerging global economic centers.  Businesses and business people from around the world travel here for work and for play.  Because Miami-Dade County is truly an international destination, it is imperative that our children—all of our children—are provided with the proper tools to succeed and thrive.

It is with this in mind that we ask Miami-Dade County Public Schools to develop and implement a true bilingual curriculum so that all of our children are fully fluent and truly bilingual by graduation.  To accomplish this, it is necessary that children be exposed to bilingual education as early as possible, but absolutely in grades K-4.  It is our belief that students who graduate without second language skills are at a distinct disadvantage which places them in the precarious position of not being able to qualify for even menial positions here in Miami-Dade County.

We believe that this forces many of our children to abandon their home in search of opportunities in other areas, depriving us of the talents of some of our best and brightest.  We also believe that this requirement—especially in view of the recent developments aimed at restoring diplomatic relations between the United States and Cuba, along with Miami’s emergence as the epicenter of Latin American business and investments, sends a strong message about the viability and survival skills of our students.  Without these skills, some of our students are disadvantaged, destined for failure and, more importantly, unable to compete on a global level.

We therefore ask for a formal meeting as soon as possible with you to discuss Miami-Dade Public School’s institution of bilingual education as part of the curriculum taught in our district.  Please contact the Board’s executive director, Ms. Retha Boone-Fye at (305) 375-4606 or rboone@miamidade.gov to make arrangements for this meeting.

Sincerely,

Stephen Hunter Johnson, Chair

Black Affairs Advisory Board

LA REFORMA EDUCATIVA EN FRANCIA

..

La ministra de Educación francesa, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem. / CHARLES PLATIAU (REUTERS)

El español se abre paso como segunda lengua extranjera

Publicado en El País, 17 de mayo del 2005

Las reformas de la educación nacional apasionan a los franceses. Y esta vez se ha convertido en la gran arma de la batalla política en la que se mezclan desde la defensa del latín y el griego hasta la controvertida enseñanza del Islam pasando por los conceptos de la historia de Francia. La joven ministra de Educación, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, marroquí y musulmana, es la diana preferida a la que a diario se lanzan decenas de flechas desde todos los frentes, incluido el suyo. El jefe de la oposición, Nicolas Sarkozy, la ha tachado de incompetente y cinco sindicatos que representan al 80 % de los docentes han convocado una huelga para el martes.

La tormenta política desatada contra la reforma educativa francesa es de tal virulencia que el martes pasado el rotativo Libération difundía en su portada una gran foto de la ministra, de 37 años, junto a un gran interrogante: “¿Y si tuviera razón?” El 11 de mayo, el expresidente Nicolas Sarkozy fue especialmente hiriente con ella: “En el combate desenfrenado por la mediocridad, Christiane Taubira [ministra de Justicia] ha sido adelantada por Belkacem”. Su reforma, dice, ”puede ser irreversible para la República”.

Uno de sus más importantes lugartenientes en la UMP (Unión por un Movimiento Popular), Bruno Le Maire, ha recogido 250 firmas de parlamentarios contra la reforma. Acusa a Belkacem de tener la osadía de reformar la enseñanza a solo nueve meses de acceder al cargo y pese a su escasa experiencia política. Para el principal partido de la oposición, la reforma educativa y Belkacem se han convertido en la gran bandera para atacar al Gobierno.

……………….

Los cambios más significativos

Estudio del islam. No hay novedad. El Islam ya se estudia en quinto (a los doce años). Las protestas vienen dadas porque la materia del cristianismo medieval pasa a ser optativa. Pero los alumnos también aprenden los inicios del cristianismo desde el primer año de secundaria y la herencia cristiana está también en toda la escolaridad.

Clases bilingües en alemán. Con el ánimo de que los alumnos se inicien antes en al aprendizaje de las lenguas vivas extranjeras, el proyecto adelanta el estudio de un primer idioma (ya en clase preparatoria antes de secundaria) y también el del segundo idioma, que se empezará un año antes (a los doce años). A cambio, se eliminaban las clases bilingües del primer año de secundaria. Tras la protesta de Berlín, los que aprenden alemán podrán seguir optando a esa enseñanza bilingüe.

Menos latín y griego. El aprendizaje de ambas lenguas muertas, optativo, se reduce. Ahora se estudian en tres cursos (entre los 12 y los 14 años) y lo sigue el 20% de los alumnos. El latín y el griego se incluirán en un gran tema bajo el epígrafe ‘Lenguas y culturas de la antigüedad’. Para frenar las críticas, se amplía la enseñanza del francés con “los aportes del latín y el griego a la lengua francesa”.

Mayor autonomía de los colegios. Podrán organizar el 20% del tiempo escolar según su criterio a las nuevas modalidades de enseñanza. Para algunos, tal margen de maniobra rompe el sistema de escuela única implantada hace treinta años para reducir las desigualdades.

Clases interdisciplinarias. Los alumnos tendrán clases transversales complementarias en las que puedan participar varios profesores durante tres horas por semana. Se trata de fomentar el debate y abordar un mismo tema desde varios puntos de vista. Los epígrafes: desarrollo sostenible, ciudadanía, mundo económico y empresarial…

Seguimiento personalizado. Se extiende a todos los alumnos con tres horas semanales en el primer curso (once años) y una hora por semana en los siguientes.

Pequeños grupos. Se crean 4.000 nuevos puestos docentes para poder crear grupos más pequeños de alumnos.

………….

La ministra recibe puñaladas incluso entre sus correligionarios socialistas. Son contrarios a la reforma el exprimer ministro de Hollande, Jean-Marc Ayrault (antes profesor de alemán), el exministro de Educación Jack Lang, e intelectuales como Jean-Pierre Le Goff, Pierre Nora y Alain Finkielkraut. La ministra les ha convertido en enemigos viscerales al tacharles de “pseudo-intelectuales”.

La enseñanza de los orígenes y la expansión del islam es uno de los motivos de polémica. Los detractores de Belkacem le acusan de minusvalorar al cristianismo y al judaísmo frente al culto musulmán, de obligar a los alumnos a estudiar el islam mientras se relega el cristianismo a una asignatura optativa. Es un síntoma más de la supuesta crisis de identidad que viven los franceses porque, de hecho, apenas hay cambios con respecto al sistema actual. El islam ya se enseña ahora en quinto (a los 12 años).

La única diferencia es que Belkacem propone ahora que el cristianismo medieval sea asignatura optativa, pero mantiene las asignaturas sobre el origen del cristianismo y el judaísmo. Todas las explicaciones han sido inútiles para algunos. Los socialistas han visto en la polémica buenas dosis de xenofobia.

Otra acusación a la ministra: ha eliminado la enseñanza del latín y el griego. Falso, pero todo vale en esta guerra. Lo cierto es que solo hay una propuesta de reducir las horas lectivas de estas lenguas muertas.

Las clases de alemán han sido otro escollo. Incluso ha originado un inédito conflicto diplomático con Berlín. La embajadora de Alemania en París, Suzanne Wasum-Rainer, hizo saber a Belkacem que el proyecto de eliminar las clases bilingües de alemán amenazaba con debilitar los acuerdos bilaterales. La ministra ha echado marcha atrás, lo que difícilmente revertirá la tendencia negativa en Francia hacia la lengua de Goethe, que elegían el 25 % de los alumnos hace 25 años frente al 15 % actual. El español, más sencillo, se abre paso en Francia como segunda lengua extranjera.

Pese a la enorme polémica levantada, la política educativa es la gran mimada por el presidente François Hollande. La única que no ha sufrido recortes. Por el contrario, su presupuesto ha crecido pese a la crisis. Este año cuenta con mil millones más que el precedente y continúa el fichaje de profesores para cumplir el programa electoral de Hollande de contratar a 60.000 nuevos docentes durante esta legislatura.

Trata así el Gobierno francés de revertir la tendencia a la baja de los resultados educativos. La espina dorsal de la igualdad de oportunidades, la escuela republicana y gratuita, se deteriora desde hace quince años con resultados mediocres (por debajo en ocasiones de la media de la OCDE) y, lo que es peor, agrandando las diferencias entre alumnos según su clase social.

La ministra Belkacem ha presentado esta reforma del primer ciclo de secundaria (para alumnos de entre 11 y 15 años) como la clave necesaria para elevar el nivel medio. Son“indispensables”, ha dicho el primer ministro, Manuel Valls, para que la escuela deje de reproducir las desigualdades. Para ello, se proyecta también formar clases menos numerosas, ampliar el seguimiento de los alumnos más atrasados y reducir clases consideradas elitistas (como las bilingües).

El proyecto está en periodo de consultas y la ministra ya ha acometido algunos cambios para reducir la tensión. Un buen puñado de intelectuales y algunos sindicatos apoyan la reforma. También una parte importante de los padres de alumnos. Pero hasta el final del periodo de consultas, el 11 de junio, la tormenta seguirá en primera línea contra un Gobierno que se percibe débil frente a sondeos y elecciones departamentales que lo dan por muerto.

REUNIÓN DE LA JUNTA ESCOLAR, 13 DE MAYO DEL 2015

Image result for miami school board meeting

Una de las intervenciones más aplaudidas de la reunión de la Junta Escolar, el miércoles 13 de mayo, fue la de María Acosta. A continuación la reproducimos íntegramente:

Many in our community have expressed our concern about the phasing out of Spanish and Spanish S and SL programs and the expansion of the Extended Foreign Language (EFL) Program across our schools in Miami-Dade. It seems the district has listened to our concerns and is suggesting to “improve world language program opportunities” hopefully for all our students.

It seems to me that the district made the decision to phase out the standard Spanish Programs and expand the EFL program with very little transparency, consultation and communication with all stakeholders who have felt totally disregarded and not respected.  This has resulted in a lack of trust in the good will and honesty of the district and school Board.

It is very important that any new plan and responses be consulted with stakeholders and with experts in the field of language acquisition and world language and dual language programs.

Let us stop placing world language programs in opposition to instruction in English.  Both are important and one supports the other.  What is learned in a language other than English contributes to the overall achievement of students.  The right to acquire a second language is not a luxury but a need in today’s globalized economy and interdependent world.  We cannot continue to claim our motto “giving our students the world” and not offer the opportunity to acquire bilingual skills to all our students, not just some, not just the elite, but to all our students. Learning a second language does not  preclude certain academic skills or intellectual superiority.  All over the world children in border towns speak two languages even when they have little formal education. Are our students less capable?

Public school’s curriculum must respond to the interest of the community it serves and in doing so M-DCPS had become a leader in world language education and programs. It seems that much has been dismantled in a very short time. It is time to reclaim our history and move even further. Let us offer a variety of world language programs so that the needs of our diverse student population are served.  We cannot fit everyone into the same mold.  But we can certainly offer some thing to every one.

Many people have said that today’s parents were not interested in world language education for their children.  If that is so then it is the role of this School Board and the school district to educate parents in the importance of multilingual skills in the 21st Century.  To neglect this need is to fail to fulfill the promise of giving our students the world.

None of this will be possible unless the district proves it’s willingness by investing funds in the world language programs  In other words put your money where your mouth is.  We cannot pretend to “improve” or implement quality programs if we are not willing to invest in them.

Yes, technology is important and we certainly are investing in it…but so is multilingual skills.

In the long run the School Board is accountable to the community it serves and this community is saying “respond to our interests, to the best interests of our students, and count us in.”

La feria del libro LeáLA reivindica la relevancia del español en EEUU

Un grupo de estudiantes llega este viernes 15 de mayo a visitar la Feria del Libro en Español de Los Ángeles, LeáLA.
KPMR News

05/15/2015 3:16 PM

Los Ángeles, 15 may (EFEUSA).- La Feria del Libro en Español de Los Ángeles, LeáLA, abrió hoy las puertas de su cuarta edición con un mensaje a favor del bilingüismo y la importancia de fomentar el uso de este idioma en Estados Unidos especialmente entre los más jóvenes, que fueron los grandes protagonistas.

El evento contó con una protocolaria inauguración en la que destacó la ausencia de Eric Garcetti, alcalde de Los Ángeles, urbe que apoya institucionalmente LéaLA y donde la mitad de la población es de origen hispano y el español es un idioma preeminente.

La organización confirmó a Efe que Garcetti estaba convocado pero declinó la invitación sin dar una razón concreta y en su lugar acudió de forma testimonial su jefa de gabinete, Ana Guerrero.

Mientras centenares de niños (cerca de 700), en su mayoría hispanos, esperaban en el centro de convenciones para entrar a la feria, Garcetti daba un discurso en la escuela privada de educación superior Whittier College, donde estudió el expresidente de EEUU Richard Nixon, y era nombrado poeta honorario.

LéaLA, uno de los eventos culturales en español más importantes de los que se realizan en EEUU, espera superar los 100.000 asistentes entre el viernes y el domingo.

La exsecretaria de Trabajo de EEUU Hilda Solís, actual supervisora del primer distrito del condado de Los Ángeles, calificó la cita de “maravillosa y vibrante” y reiteró la trascendencia de dominar el español y el inglés en este país.

“Ser bilingüe y bicultural es una gran ventaja” y destacó el papel de LéaLA como impulsor de la “lectura y la educación” que es “la base de todo progreso humano”, al tiempo que señaló que la feria “puede destruir los mitos negativos sobre la cultura latina que algunos tienen todavía”.

Solís relató su experiencia personal, cuando de niña sus padres de origen nicaragüense y mexicano la desanimaban a hablar español de tal forma que hoy el inglés es su primer idioma.

El testimonio de Solís y el hecho de que ahora se celebre LéaLA simboliza cómo el español ha dejado de ser la “lengua de la vergüenza” a tener “un lugar relevante”, en palabras del director general de Publicaciones del Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes de México (Conaculta), Ricardo Cayuela.

“La feria pretende constituirse como una plena política de inclusión cultural dirigida al mundo hispano de Estados Unidos”, manifestó Tonatiuh Bravo, rector general de la Universidad de Guadalajara (México), organización impulsora del evento.

LéaLA celebró su primera edición en 2011 y repitió en 2012 y 2013, para pasar un año en blanco en 2014 debido a la falta de fondos, y regresó en esta ocasión con el compromiso de convertirse, como mínimo, en un acontecimiento bienal, aunque su objetivo es poder asegurar de nuevo su periodicidad anual.

Tras los cortes de cinta, incluido el dedicado al pabellón de la urbe invitada, Ciudad de México, las personalidades recorrieron los pasillos de LeáLA y los visitantes empezaron a tomar contacto con las 340 editoriales presentes que llevaron obras en español, tanto de autores latinos como traducciones de novelas en otros idiomas.

En tres días, la feria acogerá más de 200 actividades y una veintena de eventos, entre los que destaca la charla con el escritor italiano Claudio Magris, ganador del Premio FIL 2014, y la presentación de “Pantallas de plata”, obra póstuma del escritor mexicano Carlos Fuentes, de la mano de su viuda Silvia Lemus.

La feria volvió a poner en marcha once talleres para niños, una de sus secciones más solicitadas, hasta el punto de que la demanda de colegios que piden visitar LéaLA supera la capacidad de la organización, por lo que se realiza un proceso de selección.

La criba también se produce dentro de los mismos colegios que desplazan al evento a los alumnos que van a poder aprovechar mejor la actividad.

“Tuvimos que escoger a los niños que hablaban el idioma y lo entendían. Muchos querían venir”, contó a Efe Patricia Villegas, profesora de tercer grado de la escuela elemental Rosemont en Los Ángeles, quien acudió con 50 alumnos y junto con su compañera Berta Herrera.

“Les digo: ‘Así como van a ver autores y les van a dar su autógrafo, así ustedes pueden también algún día escribir un libro en español’, y eso les ha motivado mucho. Por eso estoy contenta, porque van a ver que van a poder hacer algo así en el futuro’, comentó Villegas.

“Este es un acto muy importante”, coincidió Herrera, que cree que LeáLA sirve también para que los niños de familias hispanohablantes no “olviden su idioma natal”.

0
Inspiring
0
Innovative
0
LOL
0
Amazing
0
Geeky

Etiquetas

(Cerrar sesión)
0 comentarios

KPMR News

05/15/2015 3:16 PM

Los Ángeles, 15 may (EFEUSA).- La Feria del Libro en Español de Los Ángeles, LeáLA, abrió hoy las puertas de su cuarta edición con un mensaje a favor del bilingüismo y la importancia de fomentar el uso de este idioma en Estados Unidos especialmente entre los más jóvenes, que fueron los grandes protagonistas.

El evento contó con una protocolaria inauguración en la que destacó la ausencia de Eric Garcetti, alcalde de Los Ángeles, urbe que apoya institucionalmente LéaLA y donde la mitad de la población es de origen hispano y el español es un idioma preeminente.

La organización confirmó a Efe que Garcetti estaba convocado pero declinó la invitación sin dar una razón concreta y en su lugar acudió de forma testimonial su jefa de gabinete, Ana Guerrero.

Mientras centenares de niños (cerca de 700), en su mayoría hispanos, esperaban en el centro de convenciones para entrar a la feria, Garcetti daba un discurso en la escuela privada de educación superior Whittier College, donde estudió el expresidente de EEUU Richard Nixon, y era nombrado poeta honorario.

LéaLA, uno de los eventos culturales en español más importantes de los que se realizan en EEUU, espera superar los 100.000 asistentes entre el viernes y el domingo.

La exsecretaria de Trabajo de EEUU Hilda Solís, actual supervisora del primer distrito del condado de Los Ángeles, calificó la cita de “maravillosa y vibrante” y reiteró la trascendencia de dominar el español y el inglés en este país.

“Ser bilingüe y bicultural es una gran ventaja” y destacó el papel de LéaLA como impulsor de la “lectura y la educación” que es “la base de todo progreso humano”, al tiempo que señaló que la feria “puede destruir los mitos negativos sobre la cultura latina que algunos tienen todavía”.

Solís relató su experiencia personal, cuando de niña sus padres de origen nicaragüense y mexicano la desanimaban a hablar español de tal forma que hoy el inglés es su primer idioma.

El testimonio de Solís y el hecho de que ahora se celebre LéaLA simboliza cómo el español ha dejado de ser la “lengua de la vergüenza” a tener “un lugar relevante”, en palabras del director general de Publicaciones del Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes de México (Conaculta), Ricardo Cayuela.

“La feria pretende constituirse como una plena política de inclusión cultural dirigida al mundo hispano de Estados Unidos”, manifestó Tonatiuh Bravo, rector general de la Universidad de Guadalajara (México), organización impulsora del evento.

LéaLA celebró su primera edición en 2011 y repitió en 2012 y 2013, para pasar un año en blanco en 2014 debido a la falta de fondos, y regresó en esta ocasión con el compromiso de convertirse, como mínimo, en un acontecimiento bienal, aunque su objetivo es poder asegurar de nuevo su periodicidad anual.

Tras los cortes de cinta, incluido el dedicado al pabellón de la urbe invitada, Ciudad de México, las personalidades recorrieron los pasillos de LeáLA y los visitantes empezaron a tomar contacto con las 340 editoriales presentes que llevaron obras en español, tanto de autores latinos como traducciones de novelas en otros idiomas.

En tres días, la feria acogerá más de 200 actividades y una veintena de eventos, entre los que destaca la charla con el escritor italiano Claudio Magris, ganador del Premio FIL 2014, y la presentación de “Pantallas de plata”, obra póstuma del escritor mexicano Carlos Fuentes, de la mano de su viuda Silvia Lemus.

La feria volvió a poner en marcha once talleres para niños, una de sus secciones más solicitadas, hasta el punto de que la demanda de colegios que piden visitar LéaLA supera la capacidad de la organización, por lo que se realiza un proceso de selección.

La criba también se produce dentro de los mismos colegios que desplazan al evento a los alumnos que van a poder aprovechar mejor la actividad.

“Tuvimos que escoger a los niños que hablaban el idioma y lo entendían. Muchos querían venir”, contó a Efe Patricia Villegas, profesora de tercer grado de la escuela elemental Rosemont en Los Ángeles, quien acudió con 50 alumnos y junto con su compañera Berta Herrera.

“Les digo: ‘Así como van a ver autores y les van a dar su autógrafo, así ustedes pueden también algún día escribir un libro en español’, y eso les ha motivado mucho. Por eso estoy contenta, porque van a ver que van a poder hacer algo así en el futuro’, comentó Villegas.

“Este es un acto muy importante”, coincidió Herrera, que cree que LeáLA sirve también para que los niños de familias hispanohablantes no “olviden su idioma natal”.

FORO “SOS: SALVEMOS NUESTRO ESPAÑOL”- Casa Bacardí, ICCAS, 15 de mayo del 2015

Reclaman mejorar el programa de estudios bilingüe en Miami Dade

(PHOTO: GISELLE SANTALUCCI, Diario Las Américas)

The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) District III takes great pride in uniting with the Labor Council for Latin Arnerican Advancement (LCLAA), the Spanish American League Against Discrimination (SALAD), the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Florida Conference; the National Association of Cuban-American Educators (NACAE), United Teachers of Dade (UTD), Sant La and UTD’s Hispanic Educators Committee in inviting the community to a forum titled “S.O.S. Save Our Spanish” which seeks to raise awareness for the need of expanding and improving bilingual education in Miami-Dade County Public Schools.

Tuesday, May 12, 2015 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Casa Bacardi at ICCAS
University of Miami Campus
1531 Brescia Avenue (SW 64 ST) Coral Gables, Florida 33124

The forum was moderated by Ana Cuervo of Telemundo 51
Panelists: Raquel Regalado, Anette Taddeo-Goldstein, Dr. Rosa Castro Feinberg, Mercedes Toural, Dr. Shirley B. Johnson, Gepsie Metellus, Teresita Gonzalez-Angulo and Toni Miranda

To view Forum, please click here:

To view photos, please click here:

CHRISTINA VEIGA: Miami-Dade elimina varios exámenes y da respiro a estudiantes

Pubicado en El Nuevo Herald, 04/23/2015 10:09 PM

Finalmente algo de alivio para quienes enfrentan la batalla de los exámenes en Florida.

Los estudiantes que han estado agobiados por los exámenes defectuosos, ya no tendrán que enfrentarse a tantos de ellos.

El jueves, el distrito escolar de Miami-Dade decidió eliminar todos menos 10 de los 300 exámenes finales de curso que anteriormente requería la ley del estado.

Los cambios se producen aproximadamente una semana después de que el gobernador Rick Scott firmara una propuesta de ley que le da más control a los distritos sobre cuántos exámenes tienen que tomar los estudiantes.

El anuncio fue hecho ante la creciente frustración en los salones de clase respecto a los exámenes, particularmente luego de que las Evaluaciones de los Estándares de Florida (o FSA en inglés) estuviesen, una vez más, plagadas de errores computarizados a principios de esta semana.

“No entiendo cuál es el punto de estos exámenes”, dijo Antquanyia Williams, una estudiante de primer año en la secundaria Jackson Senior High. “Honestamente, creo que sólo deberíamos venir a la escuela a aprender para nuestro futuro. Nada de estos exámenes de FSA o FCAT”.

Los exámenes FSA no serán eliminados bajo la nueva ley que fue firmada el 14 de abril. Tampoco serán erradicadas las pruebas estatales de fin de año como Algebra y Biología.

Pero muchos exámenes finales desarrollados por los distritos serán eliminados. Miami-Dade ahora sólo impartirá 10 de esos exámenes y únicamente como prueba de campo a un grupo de estudiantes elegido de manera aleatoria. Broward no administrará ningún otro examen aparte de los aún exigidos por el Estado como requisito de graduación para los estudiantes o para las calificaciones tradicionales.

Los maestros aún decidirán si administrarán sus propios exámenes acumulativos.

“La razón debe prevalecer. Debemos respetar el ambiente del aula”, dijo el superintendente de Miami-Dade, Alberto Carvalho, cuando anunció la gran reducción.

La medida por parte de Miami-Dade elimina todos los exámenes finales para los estudiantes de escuela primaria. Adicionalmente, los exámenes para las materias electivas como Educación Física y Música fueron también eliminados.

“Me siento muy aliviada de que nuestros estudiantes no tengan que estar estresados”, dijo Rosie Andre, una maestra bilingüe de cuarto y quinto grado en la escuela primaria Oak Grove Elementary en el norte de Miami. “Eso nos permite ser más creativos con nuestros estudiantes”.

El estado anteriormente exigía que los distritos escolares administraran exámenes finales en todas las materias de modo que los maestros fuesen evaluados de acuerdo con los resultados. Eso habría significado crear más de 1,000 exámenes adicionales para cursos en Miami-Dade y Broward.

Ahora, los maestros que enseñan cursos no cubiertos por los finales serán evaluados, en parte, según las calificaciones de Lectura, dijo el Presidente de los Maestros Unidos de Dade, Fredrick Ingram.

La noticia fue bien recibida por los estudiantes de Miami Jackson Senior High que tuvieron con errores computarizados al tomar el FSA el lunes. El Miami Herald habló con 10 estudiantes de primer año quienes compartieron sus experiencias. Sus impresiones podían describirse con una palabra: frustración.

“Estás listo y entonces te enteras de que hay un error. Eso no está bien”, dijo Tyana Wright. “El estado debió asegurarse de que esto no pasara”.

Héctor Chávez dijo que la pantalla de su computadora se oscureció varias veces en medio del examen. Aunque le dieron tiempo adicional para recuperar los minutos perdidos por la falla en la computadora, Chávez se puso nervioso.

“Tuve que leer los textos por encima”, dijo.

Shirley Mancan dijo que toda su clase, con cerca de 28 estudiantes, recibió mensajes de error mientras trataban de registrarse. Luego de intentar acceder a los exámenes por una hora y media, los estudiantes fueron enviados de vuelta a clases y tuvieron que tomar los exámenes de nuevo al día siguiente.

El resultado fue tiempo perdido en clases importantes durante el crucial cierre del semestre.

“No he asistido a mi ‘experiencia de primer año’ en toda la semana. Tengo una C. Yo tenía una A”, dijo Wilson Huse.